Events

MESALC Graduation Ceremony, Spring 2017

Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 3:30 pm

101 Nau Hall

The Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures hosts a ceremony for our graduating 4th-year and master's degree students. This ceremony takes place annually on the same day as final exercises for the College of Arts & Sciences. Students may attend the MESALC graduation ceremony even if they are a second major within our department. Information pertaining to this year's ceremony, as well as a few frequently asked questions, can be found below. If you have further questions, please contact Cameron Clayton

2017 Graduation Ceremony

Date: Saturday, May 20th, 2017

Time: 3:30 PM

Location: Nau Auditorium

Who is invited?: Any student with a major (or second major) in our department, as well as family and friends

Students: Please RSVP to the email invitation you received so we know how many to expect! Tickets are not required.

Graduation FAQ:

1. When is MESALC's graduation ceremony?
The date, time, and location of the ceremony will fluctuate from year to year. Information about this year's ceremony can be found above. Students who have applied to graduate and who have completed a major or second major in our department will receive an email invitation to the ceremony.

2. How many people can I bring?
Nau Auditorium has 245 fixed theater-style seats and a maximum occupancy of 272. Space should not be a problem as long as students don't bring a very large number of guests. We ask that you please bring no more than 7 guests and to please RSVP letting us know how many you plan on bringing.

3. Are tickets required?
No, at this time we are not limiting seats. However, we ask that you please bring no more than 7 guests to make sure that there is enough room for everyone. Please RSVP to your email invitation and indicate how many guests you will bring so we know approximately how many people to expect.

4. Is there a reception after the ceremony?
Yes, the reception will be held in the first floor lobby of Nau Hall (by Starbucks) immediately following the ceremony. Catering by Maharaja.

5. What if my first major isn't one offered by MESALC?
You are still welcome to attend and you can still walk during our ceremony.

6. Where should I park?
Students, families, and guests are asked to find their own parking spaces. Permits are not issued by our department, and it is likely that most guests will need to park in a large lot and either take the bus or walk to the ceremony.

7. Should I arrive early?
We ask that you arrive about 15 minutes early so that you can find your seat. Graduates will sit together in alphabetical order - there will be a seat reserved for you with your name on it.

8. Is there a rehearsal?
No, there is no rehearsal for the ceremony. When you hear your name called, simply rise, walk to the faculty member who is issuing diplomas, receive your diploma, shake hands, pose for a picture, then return to your seat.

9. How will I receive my diploma?
As of Spring 2015, all graduating students will receive their diploma by mail. If you attend your department's graduation ceremony, you will receive a blank diploma when you walk. (This for symbolic purposes and so that you can take photo ops).

10. Who can walk?

In order to participate in the ceremony, you must have applied to graduate in SIS. Eligible students are those who have completed or are planning to complete their degree in the following terms: Fall 2016, January 2017, Spring 2017, or Summer 2017.


Bridges, Not Walls: The Healing Power of Literature in the Middle East & South Asia

Monday, Apr 17, 2017 - 10:30 am

342 Nau Hall

MESALC Graduation Ceremony, Spring 2016

Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 3:45 pm

Nau Auditorium

The Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures hosts a ceremony for our graduating 4th-year and master's degree students. This ceremony takes place annually on the same day as final exercises for the College of Arts & Sciences. Students may attend the MESALC graduation ceremony even if they are a second major within our department. Information pertaining to this year's ceremony, as well as a few frequently asked questions, can be found below. If you have further questions, please contact Cameron Clayton

2016 Graduation Ceremony

Date: Saturday, May 21st, 2016

Time: 3:45 PM

Location: Nau Auditorium

Who is invited?: Any student with a major (or second major) in our department, as well as family and friends

Students: Please RSVP to the email invitation you received so we know how many to expect! Tickets are not required.

Graduation FAQ:

1. When is MESALC's graduation ceremony?
The date, time, and location of the ceremony will fluctuate from year to year. Information about this year's ceremony can be found above. Students who have applied to graduate and who have completed a major or second major in our department will receive an email invitation to the ceremony.

2. How many people can I bring?
Nau Auditorium has 245 fixed theater-style seats and a maximum occupancy of 272. Space should not be a problem as long as students don't bring a very large number of guests. We ask that you please bring no more than 7 guests and to please RSVP letting us know how many you plan on bringing.

3. Are tickets required?
No, at this time we are not limiting seats. However, we ask that you please bring no more than 7 guests to make sure that there is enough room for everyone. Please RSVP to your email invitation and indicate how many guests you will bring so we know approximately how many people to expect.

4. Is there a reception after the ceremony?
Yes, the reception will be held in the first floor lobby of Nau Hall (by Starbucks) immediately following the ceremony. Catering by Maharaja.

5. What if my first major isn't one offered by MESALC?
You are still welcome to attend and you can still walk during our ceremony.

6. Where should I park?
Students, families, and guests are asked to find their own parking spaces. Permits are not issued by our department, and it is likely that most guests will need to park in a large lot and either take the bus or walk to the ceremony.

7. Should I arrive early?
We ask that you arrive about 15 minutes early so that you can find your seat. Graduates will sit together in alphabetical order - there will be a seat reserved for you with your name on it.

8. Is there a rehearsal?
No, there is no rehearsal for the ceremony. When you hear your name called, simply rise, walk to the faculty member who is issuing diplomas, receive your diploma, shake hands, pose for a picture, then return to your seat.

9. How will I receive my diploma?
As of Spring 2015, all graduating students will receive their diploma by mail. If you attend your department's graduation ceremony, you will receive a blank diploma when you walk. (This for symbolic purposes and so that you can take photo ops).

10. Who can walk?

In order to participate in the ceremony, you must have applied to graduate in SIS. Eligible students are those who have completed or are planning to complete their degree in the following terms: Fall 2015, January 2016, Spring 2016, or Summer 2016.


Indian Classical Night, 2016

Saturday, Apr 23, 2016 - 7:00 pm

McLeod Hall

Layaleena, 2016

Saturday, Apr 23, 2016 - 7:00 pm

Newcomb Ballroom

In the Shadow of the Islamic State: Sectarianism, Social Mobilization, and the War in Iraq, Syria & a Turbulent Middle East

Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016 - 7:00 pm

124 Monroe Hall

Place-Based Digital Storytelling in Beirut: A Palimpsestic Methodology

Friday, Apr 15, 2016 - 3:30 pm

132 New Cabell Hall

Sayed Kashua: Living with Dual Identity

Thursday, Apr 14, 2016 - 5:00 pm

130 Monroe Hall

Becoming Pious and Modern: Muslim Women of Secular Turkey

Tuesday, Apr 05, 2016 - 4:00 pm

332 New Cabell Hall

Innovation and Best Practices in Second Language Education

Thursday, Mar 31, 2016 - 2:30 pm

342 Nau Hall

Screening Difference: The Production and Politics of Regional Cinema

Tuesday, Mar 29, 2016 - 3:30 pm

349 New Cabell Hall

Iran Day, 2016

Saturday, Mar 26, 2016 - 6:30 pm

Newcomb Ballroom

Pakistan Day, 2016

Saturday, Mar 26, 2016 - 4:00 pm

Lambeth Field

Cinematic Blocs: Cold War Audio-Visions of Midde East / South Asia Crossroads

Thursday, Mar 24, 2016 - 3:30 pm

258 Robertson Hall

Place, Hybridity, Displacement

Thursday, Mar 24, 2016 - 2:00 pm

236 New Cabell Hall

Israeli Apartheid Week

Monday, Mar 21, 2016 - 12:00 am to Thursday, Mar 24, 2016 - 12:00 am


Threading Dissonance: Narratives of Transgression in Contemporary Egyptian Cinema

Tuesday, Mar 15, 2016 - 3:30 pm

254 Robertson Hall

The Deal with Iran: Exploring the Undiscovered Country

Monday, Feb 29, 2016 - 7:00 pm

Jefferson Hall (Hotel C)

MESALC Graduation Ceremony

Saturday, May 16, 2015 - 3:30 pm

101 Nau Hall

The Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures hosts a ceremony for our graduating 4th-year and master's degree students. This ceremony takes place annually on the same day as final exercises for the College of Arts & Sciences. Students may attend the MESALC graduation ceremony even if they are a second major within our department. Information pertaining to this year's ceremony, as well as a few frequently asked questions, can be found below. If you have further questions, please contact Cameron Clayton

2015 Graduation Ceremony

Date: Saturday, May 16th, 2015

Time: 3:30 PM

Location: Nau Auditorium

Who is invited?: Any student with a major (or second major) in our department, as well as family and friends

Students: Please RSVP to the email invitation you received so we know how many to expect! Tickets are not required.

Graduation FAQ:

1. When is MESALC's graduation ceremony?
The date, time, and location of the ceremony will fluctuate from year to year. Information about this year's ceremony can be found above. Students who have applied to graduate and who have completed a major or second major in our department will receive an email invitation to the ceremony.

2. How many people can I bring?
Nau Auditorium has 245 fixed theater-style seats and a maximum occupancy of 272. Space should not be a problem as long as students don't bring a very large number of guests. We ask that you please bring no more than 7 guests and to please RSVP letting us know how many you plan on bringing.

3. Are tickets required?
No, at this time we are not limiting seats. However, we ask that you please bring no more than 7 guests to make sure that there is enough room for everyone. Please RSVP to your email invitation and indicate how many guests you will bring so we know approximately how many people to expect.

4. Is there a reception after the ceremony?
Yes, the reception will be held in the first floor lobby of Nau Hall (by Starbucks) immediately following the ceremony. Catering by Maharaja.

5. What if my first major isn't one offered by MESALC?
You are still welcome to attend and you can still walk during our ceremony.

6. Where should I park?
Students, families, and guests are asked to find their own parking spaces. Permits are not issued by our department, and it is likely that most guests will need to park in a large lot and either take the bus or walk to the ceremony.

7. Should I arrive early?
We ask that you arrive about 15 minutes early so that you can find your seat. Graduates will sit together in alphabetical order - there will be a seat reserved for you with your name on it.

8. Is there a rehearsal?
No, there is no rehearsal for the ceremony. When you hear your name called, simply rise, walk to the faculty member who is issuing diplomas, receive your diploma, shake hands, pose for a picture, then return to your seat.

9. How will I receive my diploma?
Starting 2015, all graduating students will receive their diploma by mail. If you attend your department's graduation ceremony, you will receive a blank diploma when you walk. (This for symbolic purposes and so that you can take photo ops).


The Happiness Quotient - Swami Anubhavananda

Monday, May 04, 2015 - 5:30 pm

Lorna Sundberg International Center

A  Talk On:  The Happiness Quotient
Presented by SPICMACAY and the Citizens of Charlottesville

Come, experience, and learn how to BE HAPPY from Swami Anubhavananda!

May 4, 2015 at 5:30pm 
The Lorna Sundberg International Center

21 University Cir, Charlottesville, VA 22903

SPICMACAY and the Citizens of Charlottesville are thankful to Swami Anubhavananda for including Charlottesville in his 2015 tour schedule in USA.  A warm welcome to Swamiji.

Swami Anubhavananda, the “Be Happy Swami,” is a witty Master of Vedanta and is a true reflection of his name, Anubhava = experience, Ananda = Happiness – Experience of Happiness. With an uncanny ability to simplify spiritual truths, Swamiji never sends back anybody without a smile on the face and head full of tools for happiness to apply in life.

Parking: Limited parking is available in the lot behind the International Center. Overflow parking is available at the Brody Jewish Center at 1824 University Cir, Charlottesville, VA 22903. It is a 3 minute walk to the International Center.

The event is free, but registration is required. Please register here: http://goo.gl/forms/KAbG1izUgw

For Questions, please contact:

Jay Nottingham, SPICMACAY Ph: 434-825-4674 email: nottingham@virginia.edu

Or Vasantha Reddi, Ph: 434-825-1549; email: vasanthareddi@yahoo.com

To order talks (CDs and DVDs) by Swami Anubhavananda, visit www.justbehappy.org

Donations (checks preferred) will be accepted at the event and are tax free in the USA

"Ordinary people harvest wages out of their labor, the extra ordinary experience joy.” -  Anubhavananda


Thomas Jefferson's Qur'an: Islam and the Founders

Tuesday, Apr 28, 2015 - 4:00 pm

Small Special Collections Auditorium

History in the Present: Perspectives on the Middle East
A Public Lecture Series, 2014-2015
Presents


DENISE A. SPELLBERG

Professor of History, The University of Texas at Austin

 

Thomas Jefferson's Qur'ran: Islam and the Founders

Tuesday, April 28, 4 p.m.
Small Special Collections Library Auditorium
University of Virginia

sponsored by the Clay Endowment for the Humanities,
the Corcoran Department of History, and the Department of Religious Studies

 

“Fascinating," “revelatory,” “[its] real achievement is in
casting a coterie of founders—pre-eminently Jefferson,
Madison, and Washington—in the unlikely role of
radicals in their tolerance of Islam."
The New York Times Sunday Book Review


The Future of Afghanistan and Stability in South Asia

Monday, Apr 20, 2015 - 4:00 pm

Newcomb Hall - South Meeting Room

The Future of Afghanistan and Stability in South Asia

Professor Hassan Abbas

National Defense University, Washington DC

 

Monday, April 20th, 4 PM

South Meeting Room - Newcomb Hall

 

Prof. Hassan Abbas is the author, most recently, of The Taliban Revival: Violence and Extremism on the Pakistan-Afghanistan Frontier (Yale University Press, 2014). He has a PhD/ MALD from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. He also served as a police chief in Pakistan in the late 1990s.

 

Sponsored by the South Asia Center and the Department of History.


IWL Speaker Series - Dean Joseph Hoff

Thursday, Apr 16, 2015 - 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm

125 Minor Hall

Joseph Hoff
Interim Dean of International Education, University of Richmond

Title: Using Culture and Language Learning Strategies/programs to ensure a successful sojourn abroad

How do students learn how to learn about culture and strengthen their language skills during the study abroad sojourn? This paper will discuss the need for intervention in the learning of our students before, during and after their sojourn abroad to create spaces for reflection and strategy development. I will highlight resources available to coordinators of study abroad programs that assist students in creating strategies to increase their understanding of “general culture learning skills” as well as language learning strategies. I will showcase methods of implementation, including on-line courses that teach these and other strategies as a way to assist students in their learning while abroad.  The presentation will also discuss the Cultures and Languages across the Curriculum program as a way to continue the learning after the students have returned to the United States. 

 

This talk is highly recommended for graduate and undergraduate students!

 

For more information on this talk, please go to our website.


Hurrem Sultan: The Slave Who Became Ottoman Queen

Tuesday, Apr 14, 2015 - 4:00 pm

Small Special Collections Auditorium

History in the Present: Perspectives on the Middle East
A Public Lecture Series, 2014-2015
Presents

LESLIE PEIRCE

Professor of History, Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies
New York University

Hürrem Sultan:
The Slave Who Became Ottoman Queen

Tuesday, April 14, 4 p.m.
Small Special Collections Auditorium

Professor Peirce, a leading historian of the Ottoman Empire, is the author of The Imperial Harem: Women and Sovereignty in the Ottoman Empire (Oxford, 1993) and Morality Tales: Law and Gender in the Ottoman Court of Aintab (California, 2003). She is currently writing a popular biography of Hürrem, wife of Sultan Süleyman "The Magnificent."

Sponsored by the Clay Endowment for the Humanities and the Corcoran Department of History


YEMEN: Beyond the Brink

Tuesday, Apr 07, 2015 - 5:00 pm

101 Nau Hall

YEMEN:  Beyond the Brink

With Sheila Carapico

Why are Saudi-led forces bombing Yemen?  What catalyzed the present crisis? What's a Houthi?  Why should we care?

Tuesday April 7 @ 5 pm in 101 Nau Hall

Dr. Sheila Carapico, a leading expert on Yemen, is Professor of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Richmond.  A former Fulbright Fellow in Yemen, she also recently taught at the American University in Cairo. Carapico is the author of Civil Society in Yemen (1998) and Political Aid and Arab Activism (2013), two acclaimed books from Cambridge University Press.  Carapico is also contributing editor of Middle East Report, where she frequently writes about Yemen.

UVA event sponsors:  Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures,
Arab Students Organization, Office of the Dean of Students


Layaleena 2015!

Friday, Apr 03, 2015 - 7:30 pm

Newcomb Ballroom
Hello Everyone!! Hope you all are doing well! The day is almost here, Layaleena!
 Layaleena, or Arab Culture Night, is a night filled performances (poetry, skits, singing, debka, belly dancing, etc.) Come out  on APRIL 3 @ 7:30 PM TO THE NEWCOMB BALLROOM and enjoy the performances and most importantly the FREE FOOD (I promise there will be plenty of it)!!!

Middle Eastern Cultural Month - Open Mic Night!

Tuesday, Mar 31, 2015 - 7:00 pm

Eunoia
The Middle Eastern Leadership Council is currently hosting their second Middle Eastern Cultural Month until the end of April! We are holding an open-mic event tonight (Tuesday) at 7pm in Eunoia. Performances vary from poetry, songs, or written word! We encourage all to come out to support our fellow Uva students. There will also be free pastries, tea, and coffee. All are welcome!
 
If you would like to perform, please fill out this googleform: http://goo.gl/forms/NQkz1io7FH

Indian Classical Night, 2015

Saturday, Mar 28, 2015 - 6:00 pm

UVA Chemistry Auditorium
Indian Classical Night
March 28, 6 p.m., UVA Chemistry Auditorium
 
Experience the incredible beauty of the Indian classical arts performed by gifted UVa students, faculty, and Charlottesville community members. Mesmerizing vocal, dance, and instrumental performances will be featured. The concert is free and open to the public. Indian snacks will be served at intermission. Presented by The Society for the Promotion of Indian Classical Music and Culture Amongst Youth (SPICMACAY), the Hindu Students Council (HSC), and the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library (JMRL).
 
Where: Chemistry Auditorium, (CHEM 402), 409 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904
 
Parking: Available in the lots off Whitehead Road (behind the Chemistry Building – see MAP) or in the Newcomb garage on Emmet Street (see MAP)
 
For more information please contact:
HSC: Sapna Rao - sr5bm@virginia.edu
SPICMACAY: Jay Nottingham – nottingham@virginia.edu
  

A Debate: One-State, Two-State, Red State, Blue State?

Thursday, Mar 26, 2015 - 8:00 pm

402 Wilson Hall

Dr. William Quandt and Helena Cobban. A Debate: One-State, Two-State, Red State, Blue State? 402 Wilson Hall, 8:00 PM, followed by Q&A.


On Israeli Apartheid: From Ferguson to Palastine

Wednesday, Mar 25, 2015 - 7:00 pm

101 Nau Hall

Human Rights Lawyer Dr. Noura Erakat. On Israeli Apartheid: From Ferguson to Palastine. 101 Nau Hall, 7:00 PM, followed by Q&A. Sponsored by the College Council.


Survivors into Minorities: Armenians in Post-Genocide Turkey

Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015 - 5:00 pm to 6:30 pm

108 Clark Hall

Commemoration of the Centennial of the 1915 Armenian Genocide

 

Survivors into Minorities:

Armenians in Post-Genocide Turkey

Lerna Ekmekcioglu

Associate Professor of History, MIT

 

Tuesday, March 24

5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

108 Clark Hall

 

Panel Discussion to Follow:

Vigen Guroian, Religious Studies

Shankar Nair, Religious Studies

Jeffrey Rossman, History

Joshua White, History

Elizabeth Thompson, History

 

Sponsored by CREES, Office of the Dean of Arts & Sciences, History Department


Weaponizing Scripture

Sunday, Mar 22, 2015 - 6:15 pm

South Lawn

Weaponizing Scripture?

The second annual graduate colloquium in
Scripture, Interpretation, and Practice


March 22nd & 23rd, 2015
South Lawn
The University of Virginia

Plenary:
Dr. Aref Nayed, Libyan Ambassador to
the United Arab Emirates


“Scriptures as Operational
Artifacts: Neutralizing Rather
than Actualizing Scripture”

Sunday, March 22nd, 6:15 pm
Nau 101
Open to the public

Ambassador Nayed was ranked among the top 50 most influential Muslims in the 2014/15 edition
of The Muslim 500. In addition to his ambassadorial duties, Dr. Nayed is the founder and director
of Kalam Research and Media, Senior Advisor to the Cambridge Inter-Faith Programme, Fellow of
the Royal Aal Al-Bayt Institute in Jordan, Visiting Professor at Fatih Sultan Mehmet University in
Istanbul, and a member of the Board of Advisors at the Templeton Foundation.

 

Panels (Nau 342):
Scripture and the Passions: Sunday, 12:45 pm
Scripture and the State: Sunday, 4:00 pm
Scripture and Subversion: Monday, 9:30 am
Scripture: Who’s In? Who’s Out?: Monday, 1:00 pm

This colloquium is generously sponsored by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Institute for Practical
Ethics and Public Life, the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at Georgetown
University, the Project on Lived Theology, the Society for Scriptural Reasoning, the Institute of the Humanities
and Global Cultures, the office of the Dean for Humanities and the Arts, the Office of Diversity and Equity, Office
of the Vice Provost, the Jewish Studies Program, the Department of English, the Department of History, the
Department of Religious Studies, and the Virginia Center for the Study of Religion.

www.sipgradconference.wordpress.com


South Asian Studies Student Gathering

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2015 - 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

130 Monroe Hall

Hindi-Urdu students will be discussing some of the South Asian performing arts. Snacks from Milan Restaurant will be served!


IWL Film Series - Persian

Wednesday, Feb 25, 2015 - 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm

125 Minor Hall

Discussion Leader: Alireza Korangy (Assistant Professor & Persian Language
Program Coordinator, Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages
and Cultures)

Movie Title: Bashu, gharibeh kouchak ـ ی ب اا [Bashu, the little Stranger]
(1990)

Description: Little Bashu is a young boy from South of Iran who loses his home and
family in a bombing raid and instinctively flees to a region far away from the battlefront.
In this alien environment everything seems strange to the boy. Nai, a woman whose
husband has gone on a journey, finds Bashu in her farm and gives him shelter. After
Bashu tells her of his past life, Nai accepts him as a son and tries to initiate him to the
ways of life in the region. Despite cultural differences, and the fact that they do not speak the
same language, Bashu and Nai slowly form a strong bond; and Nai continues to keep the boy in spite of numerous difficulties and the objections of relatives and neighbors. Ultimately, Nai’s husband returns and agrees with his wife that Bashu does indeed have a place in their little family. 

 

This event is co-organized by the Institute of World Languages and the Department of Media Studies. All films are free and subtitled in English. Films are screened from 6:30pm - 9:00pm.


Prospective Professor to Give Job Talk

Thursday, Feb 05, 2015 - 3:30 am to 5:00 am

Monroe 118

Nizar Hermes will be visiting to give his job talk on The Poet(ry) of Fitna: Ibn al-Qaysarani's Porems on the Francks. Please join the Department for the lecture and share any feedback that you might have with a professor or administrator.


Prospective Professor to Give Job Talk

Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 - 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm

Monroe 118

Job talk will be given by Raymond Farrin, Ph.D. on "Tradition and Innovation in Classical Arabic Poetry."


Spring Education Abroad Fair

Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 - 11:00 am to 2:00 pm

Newcomb South Meeting Room

The Spring Education Abroad fair will be hosted on January 21 from 11-2 in the Newcomb South Meeting Room. Be sure to check it out!


Standard, National, and Colloquial Varieties of Persian

Friday, Oct 31, 2014 - 4:30 pm

G120 Claude Moore Nursing Building

This presentation will explore the notions of “standard” in the Persian language. This notion is complicated both by the existence of three national varieties (in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan) and by the presence within each of manifold differences between written/formal and spoken/colloquial Persian. We will explore the concept of a supranational variety of Persian, as well as the evolution of standards within the Tajik, Afghan and Iranian varieties; in addition to recent claims of narrowing distinctions between Afghan and Iranian Persian. In each national case, we will examine the role of the dialect of the capital city (Dushanbe, Kabul and Tehran) in the formation of a standard or national variety. In the Iranian context, we will explore differences between the Tehrani dialect and what might be termed a “national colloquial variety”.

DR. COREY MILLER received his Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania, where he focused on phonetics and sociolinguistics. He worked for several years in the speech technology industry, on both speech recognition and synthesis. In 2009 he came to the University of Maryland, College Park, where he is serving as a Senior Research Scientist at the Center for Advanced Study of Language. Corey’s focus is on projects regarding the Persian language, including its vocabulary, morphology, dialects and taarof (Persian traditional notion of hospitality).


The Sorrow And The Joy: Film Screening

Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 - 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm

127 Ruffner Hall

In 680 CE/61 AH, Imam Hussein, the grandson of the prophet Mohammad, was martyred in Karbala, Iraq on the 10th of the Muslim month of Muharram. Muslims, particularly Shia Muslims, all over the world commemorate this event to remember the sacrifices made by Hussein, his family, and his followers. Every year, millions of people in Pakistan and India also remember the martyrdom of Hussein and perform various rites and rituals.

 

This documentary, filmed in the city of Hyderabad, Sindh, Pakistan in 2011 and 2012, highlights several aspects of Muharram’s ceremonies and rituals. Important aspects of these rituals and ceremonies are the regionally distinct musical and bodily performances that are linked with the constructed history, knowledge, and images of the past.


STS Colloquium - Kavita Philip

Tuesday, Sep 16, 2014 - 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm

341 Mechanical Engineering

STS Colloquium (jointly sponsored by Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures, Asia Institute and the College)

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

3:30pm - 5:00pm 341 Mechanical Engineering Building

Speaker: Kavita Philip (University of California, Irvine)

Databases and Politics: Some lessons from doing South Asian STS

Why look at science, technology and postcolonialism? Is Indian technological modernity a good model for thinking these together? What might it mean to think South Asian studies (and, in general, Area Studies) together with Technology Studies? India is only one among many possible spaces from which to theorize; but the issues of postcolonial technopolitics that are emerging across the postcolonial world are of central and practical importance to a range of concerns that cut across global institutionalized forms of the humanities & the social, computational and natural sciences.There are powerful resonances, in secular modernizing India, between the buzzwords of technological innovation and conventional modes of representing religion, nation, nature, and gender. Recognizing that we are immersed in an assemblage that calls for the development of new forms of interdisciplinarity, this paper seeks to articulate a framework through which we might interrogate the constitutive intersectionality of technoscience, postcolonialism, and lived histories of difference.


Study Abroad Fair

Wednesday, Sep 03, 2014 - 11:00 am to 3:00 pm

Newcomb Hall, Ballroom

At the Study Abroad Fair, UVa students can access information about the many education abroad opportunities available to them. They can also meet with program representatives and talk to peers who have pursued their studies abroad. Twenty-six UVa faculty-led programs will be represented at the Fair along with the University Internship Program, Center for Undergraduate Excellence/Fulbright, Student Financial Services (Financial Aid Office) and the Summer Language Institute. Twenty-four outside program providers are sending representatives, and students will be able to talk with peers about opportunities to study at UVa’s exchange partner universities. There are study options in Africa, Asia, Europe, Australia/New Zealand and the Americas; short-term programs along with semester options; direct credit programs as well as transfer credit programs; and opportunities that combine course work with applied learning opportunities (internships, research projects and service projects). For more information, contact Erica Goldfarb at evg5f@virginia.edu.


MESALC Graduation Ceremony

Sunday, May 18, 2014 - 3:45 pm

Nau Auditorium

Graduation

The Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures hosts a ceremony for our graduating 4th-year and master's degree students. This ceremony takes place annually on the same day as final exercises. Students may attend the MESALC graduation ceremony even if they are a second major within our department. Information pertaining to this year's ceremony, as well as a few frequently asked questions, can be found below. If you have further questions, please contact Cameron Clayton

2014 Graduation Ceremony

Date: Sunday, May 18th, 2014

Time: 3:45 PM

Location: Nau Auditorium

Who is invited?: Any student with a major (or second major) in our department, as well as family and friends

Students: Please RSVP to the email invitation you received so we know how many to expect! Tickets are not required.

Graduation FAQ:

1. When is MESALC's graduation ceremony?
The date, time, and location of the ceremony will fluctuate from year to year. Information about this year's ceremony can be found above. Students who have applied to graduate and who have completed a major or second major in our department will receive an email invitation to the ceremony.

2. How many people can I bring?
Nau Auditorium has 245 fixed theater-style seats and a maximum occupancy of 272. Space should not be a problem as long as students don't bring a very large number of guests. Therefore, we are not limiting how many guests students can bring at this time. However, we do ask that you RSVP with your estimated number of guests.

3. Are tickets required?
No, at this time we are not limiting seats. However, please RSVP to your email invitation and indicate how many guests you will bring so we know approximately how many people to expect.

4. Is there a reception after the ceremony?
Yes, the reception will be held in the first floor lobby of Nau Hall (by Starbucks) immediately following the ceremony.

5. What if my first major isn't one offered by MESALC?
You are still welcome to attend. When you walk during our ceremony you will receive a blank diploma. You will receive your real diploma at the graduation ceremony of the department that offers your first major, OR it can be picked up the following day in Carruther's Hall.

EXAMPLE: You are a Foreign Affairs first major, Middle East Studies second major -  you will receive your real diploma at the Politics graduation ceremony and a blank diploma at the MESALC graduation ceremony.

6. Where should I park?
Students, families, and guests are asked to find their own parking spaces. Permits are not issued by our department, and it is likely that most guests will need to park in a large lot and either take the bus or walk to the ceremony.

7. Should I arrive early?
We ask that you arrive about 15 minutes early so that you can find your seat. Graduates will sit together in alphabetical order - there will be a seat reserved for you with your name on it.

8. Is there a rehearsal?
No, there is no rehearsal for the ceremony. When you hear your name called, simply rise, walk to the faculty member who is issuing diplomas, receive your diploma, shake hands, pose for a picture, then return to your seat.
 

 


The Visual Culture of Yoga

Thursday, Apr 24, 2014 - 6:00 pm

153 Campbell Hall

International Career Resources Information Session

Wednesday, Apr 23, 2014 - 5:00 pm

389 Newcomb Hall

Who's Reporting Your News and Why it Matters

Tuesday, Apr 22, 2014 - 4:00 pm

Brooks Hall Commons

Women's Rights and Economic Development in Afghanistan

Thursday, Apr 17, 2014 - 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm

108 Clark Hall

The Violent Desires of Hindi Pulp

Friday, Apr 04, 2014 - 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm

132 New Cabell Hall

Dubai and Singapore: Asian Diasporics, Global Logistics, Company Rule

Friday, Apr 04, 2014 - 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm

Brooks Hall - Second Floor Conference Room

Seeking a Transitional Justice Strategy for Syria

Thursday, Apr 03, 2014 - 11:30 am to 1:00 pm

Caplin Pavilion

Indian Classical Night

Saturday, Mar 22, 2014 - 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Chemistry Auditorium

Indian Influences on Adeni Culture & Dialect in Yemen

Friday, Feb 14, 2014 - 1:00 pm

Shea House

Presentation by Suad Mohamed - "Indian Influences on Adeni Culture & Dialect in Yemen" - Part of the Spring 2014 Arabic Lecture Series.

Friday, Feb. 14

1 PM

Shea House


Scholarships for UVA Students to Study in Israel

Monday, Feb 10, 2014 - 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm

216 Minor Hall

Information Session:

Scholarships for UVa Students to Study in Israel

 

Monday, February 10

4:00–5:00 PM

 

International Studies Office (ISO) Library

Minor Hall 216

 

The ISO and the Jewish Studies Program are sponsoring an information session on Monday, February 10, on scholarships for UVA undergraduates to study in Israel in study abroad programs at Ben-Gurion University and the University of Haifa in 2014–2015.

 

All undergraduates are welcome to attend and apply!

 
Ben-Gurion University Scholarship
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, in Beer-Sheva, Israel offers scholarships for tuition and housing to two UVa undergraduates to study there during either Fall Semester 2014 or Spring Semester 2015. One scholarship is for a student whose focus is the social sciences or humanities, the other is for a student whose focus is the natural sciences.  All UVa undergraduates are encouraged to apply. A scholarship committee reviews the applications and makes awards on a number of factors, including quality of the application and academic merit. To apply, please complete the Education Abroad Scholarship Application online. For further information, please contact Gabriel Finder, Director of the Jewish Studies Program (gf6n@virginia.edu) and/or Leah Barber, Education Abroad Advisor, International Studies Office (ldb7v@virginia.edu).
 
Haifa University Scholarship
The University of Haifa in Israel offers scholarships to two UVa undergraduates to study there during either Fall Semester 2014 or Spring Semester 2015. All UVa undergraduates are encouraged to apply. A scholarship committee reviews the applications and makes awards on a number of factors, including quality of the application and academic merit. To apply, please complete the Education Abroad Scholarship Application online. For further information, please contact Gabriel Finder, Director of the Jewish Studies Program (gf6n@virginia.edu) and/or Leah Barber, Education Abroad Advisor, International Studies Office (ldb7v@virginia.edu).
Gabriel N. Finder
Ida and Nathan Kolodiz Director of Jewish Studies
Associate Professor
Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures
University of Virginia
 

 


Arabic Conversation Club

Wednesday, Feb 05, 2014 - 8:30 pm

Starbucks - The Corner

The Arabic Conversation Club will host its first meeting Wednesday, February 5th at 8:30 PM at Starbucks on The Corner! Contact Dani (dep5tm) or Rado (rnf3uc) for more information.


Hoda Barakat Roundtable

Monday, Feb 03, 2014 - 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm

Newcomb Hall - Kaleidoscope Room

The Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures Presents...

Roundtable Discussion with Hoda Barakat

Monday, February 3rd

5 PM - 7 PM

Newcomb Hall - Kaleidoscope Room

 

Light refreshments will be provided

 

Join us for a talk with Arabic Novelist, Hoda Barakat

Discussants: Mohammed Sawaie and Hanadi Al-Samman

 

Barakat is a highly accalaimed Lebanese author who has lived and worked in Paris since 1989. Winner of the 2001 Naguib Mahfouz Medal for Literature.

This event is sponsored by the Center for International Studies, the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures, and the French Department.


2013 Language Fair

Thursday, Nov 14, 2013 - 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm

Newcomb South Meeting Room

Learn a new language, see the world, expand your horizons, and change your life!

2013 LANGUAGE FAIR

Newcomb Hall

Thursday, November 14th from 1:00pm to 3:00pm

Language Resource Fair

Location: Newcomb South Meeting Room

Meet faculty teaching foreign languages at UVA, learn about courses and opportunities to start, improve or practice a language.

Visit resource tables featuring Arabic, Biblical and Modern Hebrew, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Sanskrit, Spanish, Swahili, Tibetan, and Urdu.

Listen to Student Testimonies at 2:00pm and get tips on how to learn a language or improve your skills. Learn how having fluency in a foreign language has changed these students' lives. Speakers include:

  • Lindsey Lucente and Sara Jameel - Arabic speakers
  • Erik Nelson and Marigail Wynne - Swahili speakers
  • Sarah Bridenhagen and Stephen Hartka - French speakers, participating live from France via Skype
  • Chuck Cascio - Chinyanja speaker

Language Conversation Circles

Location: Newcomb Commonwealth Room

Let's be casual in another language!

Grab some coffee and chat with native speakers or just listen to conversations in Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, French, German, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Hebrew, Portuguese, Spanish, Swahili, and Tibetan.

International Education Week

November 11-16, 2013

University of Virginia

www.virginia.edu/uvaglobal/iew

 


God Has Brought Me Laughter: Exploring Humor in the Tanakh

Friday, Nov 08, 2013 - 12:00 pm to 1:30 pm

211 Gibson Hall

“God Has Brought Me Laughter: Exploring Humor in the Tanakh”

Jewish Studies Colloquium (Jewish Studies Program)

Friday, 8 November 2013, 12:00-1:30 pm

Gibson 211

 

This talk examines a few of the different types of biblical humor, including instances of bodily humor and occasional scenes resembling slapstick. It also inquires whether humor at times may be deployed not only to entertain but to make a theological point.


The Language of Divine Retribution in the Hebrew Bible

Thursday, Nov 07, 2013 - 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm

342 Nau Hall

“The Language of Divine Retribution in the Hebrew Bible”

JCA Colloquium (Department of Religious Studies)

Thursday, 7 November 2013, 3:30-4:45 pm

Nau 342

 

Prof. Kaminsky will explore the Hebrew Bible's language of divine retribution and its implications for understanding Job and certain expressions in Psalms, Proverbs, and Deuteronomy. He will seek to nuance the now pervasive idea that rigid models of divine reward and punishment were regnant in ancient Israel until the exilic authors of Job definitively challenged and thus swept away these supposedly theologically bankrupt notions.


The Nightingale of Future's Garden: Reflections on the "Rejected" Corpus of Ghalib

Friday, Nov 01, 2013 - 3:15 pm

232 New Cabell Hall

 

Mehr Afshan Farooqi, University of Virginia
 
The great nineteenth century Urdu poet Asadullah Khan Ghalib’s muravvaj or current Divan contains roughly half of the verses composed, as he was an exacting editor of his own compositions. Ghalib was a stern, zealous critic of his poetry; sometimes he took criticism of his peers to heart. Much of the mustarad or discarded work belongs to his early period, when his poetic language was closer to Persian than Urdu, and his themes were quite abstruse. Ghalib’s early work was almost forgotten until a manuscript surfaced in Bhopal in 1918, the nuskha-e Bhopal (Bhopal manuscript, dated 1821). It was published as nuskha-e Hamidiya in 1921. Much later in 1969 a manuscript in Ghalib’s own hand was discovered, again in Bhopal. It contained some of his earliest compositions (1816). Despite the discovery of the new material Ghalib scholars continue to focus on the muravvaj Divan. My paper will present an overview of the so-called discarded ghazals and pose questions examining the exigencies of ‘rejection’ and how that impacts our view of Ghalib as a whole.”

Devadasis: Gender Politics, the Nation, and Morals

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2013 - 5:00 pm

342 Nau Hall

"Devadasis: Gender Politics, the Nation and Morals"

Dr. Anita Singh
Benares Hindu University
Fulbright-Nehru Scholar,
University of Virginia

Tuesday, October 29th
5:00pm
Nau 342

Anita Singh is Professor in the Department of English and Co-coordinator of the Centre for Women’s Studies and Development at Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. Her areas of interest are Gender Studies and Performance Studies. Her recent book is Gender, Space and Resistance: Women and Theatre in India. Presently, she is a Fulbright Nehru Visiting Scholar at the University of Virginia.
 


Transposing the "Great Game" to the Sphere of Culture: Soviet-Indian Cultural Interactions in the 1920s

Friday, Oct 25, 2013 - 4:30 pm

118 Monroe Hall

“Transposing the ‘Great Game’ to the Sphere of Culture: Soviet-Indian Cultural Interactions in the 1920s”

A lecture by

Katerina Clark

Professor of Comparative Literature and of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Yale University

Friday, October 25, 4:30 P.M.

Monroe Hall 118

Open to faculty, students & the public
_____________________________________________________________________
After the Bolshevik Revolution the (British) Indian government reinforced its border security in the northwest, making it virtually impossible for Soviet agents to penetrate, and the emir of Afghanistan refused to allow Moscow-backed Indian revolutionaries passage through his country. In consequence, the long-standing British-Russian rivalry over South Asia (the ‘Great Game’) was largely redirected on the Soviet side to the sphere of culture: the All-Union Society for Cultural Links with Abroad (VOKS) launched a campaign to establish contacts with, and send materials to, Indian institutions, in defiance of censorship and the police; the theories of Aryanism, which in most versions supported Indo-British cultural links, were challenged by the Japhetic theories of Nikolai Marr, and Rabindranath Tagore was repeatedly invited to the Soviet Union, a visit that finally took place in 1930. After 1928 when supervision of the Indian communist movement was handed over to the Communist party of Great Britain, a three-way pattern emerged whereby, under the patronage of British Communist and Comintern officials such as Ralph Fox, Indian Leftist writers such as Mulk Raj Anand formed Moscow-aligned all-Indian cultural organizations and began to publish in the Soviet Union.
________________________________________________________________________________________
For questions, please contact Anna Kromin (ask4mm@virginia.edu)

Beit Midrash

Friday, Oct 25, 2013 - 9:30 am

122 Monroe Hall

 

The Deborah Gabry Memorial Lecture presents:

Student Workshop
(Beit midrash)

with

 

Rabbi Benay Lappe

 

 

Friday, Oct. 25, 2013 at 9:30 am

 

Monroe 122, University of Virginia


 

Rabbi Benay Lappe, Executive Director and Rosh Yeshiva of SVARA, was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary in 1997and was the first openly lesbian Conservative rabbi. She holds three additional advanced degrees, in teaching and rabbinics. An innovator in combining Jewish text study and queer theory, Rabbi Lappe was the founding director of the Gay & Lesbian Lehrhaus Judaica in New York and the Queer Jewish Think Tank in Los Angeles, both of which continue to thrive. Rabbi Lappe currently serves as Professor of Talmud at the Hebrew Seminary of the Deaf, in Chicago, Visiting Professor of Talmud at the Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies at the Graduate Theological Union, in Berkeley, is an Associate at CLAL, and an educator and consultant at Keshet, in Boston. While learning and teaching Talmud are her greatest passion, Rabbi Lappe is also a licensed pilot, shoemaker, and patent-holding inventor.

 


Goliath: Life and Loathing in Greater Israel

Thursday, Oct 24, 2013 - 7:00 pm

101 Nau Hall

Max Blumenthal showcasing his new book, Goliath: Life and Loathing in Greater Israel --

 
"Goliath: Life and Loathing in Greater
 
Israel is New York Times bestselling
 
author Max Blumenthal's devastating
 
journey through Israel and an anatomy
 
of the extremist takeover of a nation."
 
 

Nau 101

 

October 24th (Thursday) at 7 pm

 
 

FREE KABOB PALACE.

 
 
Featuring a short documentary by Blumenthal highlighting African refugees in Israel.
 
Co-sponsored with the Ethiopian Student Union and the African Student Initiative

The People's Sovereignty in India: A Historical Framework for the Legal Framing of the Modern Indian Voter

Thursday, Oct 24, 2013 - 5:00 pm

211 Nau Hall
This talk will embed the modern Indian voter, as a legal construct, within a larger history of ideas on sovereignty, drawn from both Europe and India itself. The talk will frame the development of electoral law in 20th century India within a “secular theology” underlying the concept of the “people’s sovereignty.” This was embodied not only in ideas, but also in voting practices such as the secret ballot and in legal concepts such as “undue influence.” These have framed the voter both as a political being and, simultaneously, as an autonomous agent, claiming autonomy from social and political pressure. The talk will trace the backdrop to this development in 19th century Europe, 20th century colonial India, and post-1947 India. It will also examine how this has played out within the distinctive structure of the modern Indian electoral system.
 
David Gilmartin is Professor of History at North Carolina State University; he is also campus director of the North Carolina Center for South Asian Studies. He is the author of 'Empire and Islam: Punjab and the Making of Pakistan' (Berkeley, 1988) a book that hasn't been surpassed for its understanding of the contribution of Islam in the making of Pakistan, and co-editor (with Bruce Lawrence) of ‘Beyond Turk and Hindu: Rethinking Religious Identities in Islamicate South Asia’ (2000). He has also written articles on an incredibly wide variety of topics, I will mention just a few as an indication of his contribution to the field:
 
* ‘Art on Trial: Civilization and Religion in the Persona and Painting of M. F. Husain’ (with Barbara Metcalf) in Sumathi Ramaswamy ed., Barefoot across the Nation: M.F. Husain and the Idea of India, 2010.
 
* ‘Rule of Law, Rule of Life: Caste, Democracy and the Courts in India’, American Historical Review, 115, 2, 2010.
 
* ‘Sufism, Exemplary Lives and Social Science in Pakistan’ in Carl W. Ernst and Richard C. Martin ed., Contemporary Islam between Theory and Practice, 2010.
 
* ‘Imperial Rivers: Irrigation and British Visions of Empire’ in Dane Kennedy and Durba Ghosh ed, Decentring Empire: Britain, India and the Transcolonial World, 2006.
 
* ‘Cattle, Crime and Colonialism: Property as Negotiation in North India’, in Indian Economic and Social History Review, vol. 40, no. 1, 2003.
 
* ‘Partition, Pakistan and South Asian History: In Search of a Narrative’ in Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 57, no. 4, 1998.
 
He has been on the editorial board of the Journal of Asian Studies; a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC, the National Humanities Center at the Research Triangle Park in North Carolina, and at the Stanford Humanities Center. He has also been a key mentor and interlocutor to American and, indeed, Pakistani students working in and on Pakistan for the last couple of decades.
This lecture is being co-sponsored by the South Asia Center, the Department of History, the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Cultures, and the Taraknath Das Fund.

Various Positions: Sex, Love, and Deviant Behavior in the Talmud

Thursday, Oct 24, 2013 - 4:00 pm

Peabody Hall

Various Positions: Sex, Love

and Deviant Behavior in the
Talmud

Rabbi Benay Lappe

 
 
Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013 at 4:00 pm
 
Peabody Hall, University of Virginia

 
According to the ancient Rabbis, which sexual positions does
God recommend and which does God forbid? What aspects of
sexual relationships really matter? Rabbi Lappe will consider a
Talmudic passage that deals with issues of sex, intimacy,
relationships, and love. Her methodology follows a traditional
style of learning, but takes a more open and even radical
approach to the text.

Check out SAVRA-- a traditionally radical yeshiva

 


Arab Revolution & Film

Friday, Oct 18, 2013 - 1:00 pm to 7:00 pm

107 Clark Hall

ARAB REVOLUTION & FILM

A film festival featuring

Egyptian scholar & filmmaker

VIOLA SHAFIK

1:00: “My Name is Not Ali,” Shafik’s controversial 2011 film about an Arab actor exploited by the famed German director Rainer Werner Fassbinder

3:30: “It Was Better Tomorrow,” a 2012 documentary on the Tunisian Revolution

5:00: “Scent of Oblivion,” extracts of Shafik’s new film on Egypt’s revolution

6:00: Discussion with Hector Amaya, Media Studies & Hanadi al-Samman, MESALC

FRIDAY, OCT. 18, 1-7pm: Clark 107


The Law In These Parts

Thursday, Oct 17, 2013 - 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm

101 Nau Hall
special screening of the acclaimed documentary
about the Israeli legal regime in the Occupied Territories
 

THE LAW IN THESE PARTS

BY
Ra’anan Alexandrowicz
 
Thursday, October 17, Nau Hall 101, 7-9pm with the participation of the director.
 
Can a modern democracy impose a prolonged military occupation on another people while retaining its core democratic values? The Law In These Parts explores how Israel created a legal framework for the occupation through testimonies of the military legal professionals who were the architects of the system and helped run it in its formative years. The film was awarded four major international prizes including the World Cinema Jury Prize in 2012 Sundance Film Festival.
 
Ra’anan Alexandrowicz was born in Jerusalem and lives in Israel. He carved name recognition as writer and director of award-winning films such as James’ Journey to Jerusalem, and the documentaries The Inner Tour and Martin.
 
A discussion will follow the screening of the film.
 
The event is sponsored by the Jewish Studies Program, the History Department, and MESALC
 
For information contact Alon Confino confino@virginia.edu

 


Where is Egypt Headed & What Does It Mean For The United States?

Wednesday, Oct 09, 2013 - 7:00 pm

Jefferson Hall
"Where is Egypt headed & What does it mean for the United States?"
with
Nancy Youssef
Cairo Correspondent for McClatchy Newspapers
 
7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 9
Jefferson Hall
 
Nancy Youssef is a UVa alumnus and winner of the the University's Lawrence Hall Award for Distinguished Journalism covering the Middle East. Her parents are from Egypt, and she has visited the region all her life. Currently, she covers the Middle East and Islamic world for McClatchy. Previously, she served as the paper’s chief Pentagon correspondent and Baghdad bureau chief. Read more about Ms. Youssef here.

Arabic Lecture Series: Nancy Youssef

Tuesday, Oct 08, 2013 - 5:00 pm

Shea House
Arabic Lecture Series
with
Nancy Youssef
Cairo Correspondent for McClatchy Newspapers
 
5 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 8
Shea House
 
Ms. Youssef will present in Modern Standard Arabic on the political revolution in Egypt and what it means for the United States. Come hear her story and ask questions. ALL LEVELS of Arabic are welcome. Read more about Ms. Youssef here.

Principles for Negotiating Biblical Androcentrism: The Damascus Document and the Mekhilta of R. Ishmael

Thursday, Oct 03, 2013 - 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm

342 Nau Hall
Elizabeth Shanks Alexander, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, UVA
“Principles for Negotiating Biblical Androcentrism: The Damascus Document and the Mekhilta of R. Ishmael”
Thursday, 3 October 2013, 3:30-4:45 pm
Nau 342
 
It is a commonplace that the Bible, like most ancient literature which has survived into our day, was written primarily by men, about men, and aimed at a male audience. This feature of the biblical text has vexed contemporary feminist interpreters, especially those who understand the Bible's message to be relevant for both men and women. What is perhaps more surprising is that the androcentric features of biblical scripture troubled ancient Jewish interpreters. This talk examines the efforts of two groups of ancient Jewish interpreters who, like feminist readers today, assumed that the Bible’s explicit address to males entailed an implicit address to females also. While many instances of androcentric language were assessed on a case-by-case basis, the Damascus Document and the Mekhilta of R. Ishmael developed principles to resolve the ambiguity on a broad scale. In this colloquium we will explore the common features of their principles for including women as implicit subjects of the Bible’s masculine language, as well as features distinctive to the two social communities that produced them.

Teach-In on Syria & Fundraiser for Refugees

Thursday, Sep 26, 2013 - 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm

101 Nau Hall

 

Teach-In on Syria

&

Fundraiser for Refugees

 
 
 

Thursday, September 26, 2013

6:00 to 7:00 p.m.

101 Nau Hall


 

 

Featuring

Moderator:

  • Joshua M. White, History

 

Panelists:

 

  • Ahmed H. al-Rahim, Religious Studies, “Islamist Ideologies in Syria”

 

  • Hanadi al-Samman, MESALC, “The Syrian Revolution and the Plight of Refugees Today”

 

  • Jonah Schulhofer-Wohl, Politics, “Civil War in Syria”

 

  • Elizabeth Thompson, History, “Religion and War since 1913”

 

  • David Waldner, Politics, “Syria, Before: Dictatorship and the Growth of Public Opposition to the Regime”

 

And a film presentation on the refugee experience

 

Co-sponsored by the Arab Student Organization

 


 

 


Arabic Conversation Club: Interest Meeting

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2013 - 8:30 pm

Starbucks on the Corner, upstairs

Interest Meeting: Wednesday, September 25th, 8:30 PM, upstairs room in Starbucks on the Corner.

Questions? Please email Dani Psimas at dep5tm@virginia.edu or Radobice Fass at rnf3uc@virginia.edu.


The Idea of Asia in Tagore and His Times

Friday, Sep 20, 2013 - 3:15 pm

Lecture by Professor Sugata Bose (Harvard).


Mapping Feminist Debates: Questions from the Indian Context

Wednesday, Sep 18, 2013 - 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm

229A Bryan Hall

Mapping Feminist Debates: Questions from the Indian Context

Anita Singh

Visiting Fulbright Lecturer at UVA, Fall 2013

Professor of English & Co-Coordinator, Centre for Women’s Studies & Development

Banaras Hindu University

 

Wednesday, Sept 18th – 3:30 to 5:00 PM – Bryan Hall, Room 229A

 
The appellation ‘Indian’ when used for feminist theories implies a political and cultural singularity. This presentation purports to see feminist theories in India as a challenge to this reduction of local feminism. Indian Feminists have called for a revised politics of location – revised because unlike its initial articulation, the relation between experience and knowledge is now seen to be one not of correspondence, but troubled with history, exigency and struggle. Indian feminism is clearly a rejoinder to issues specifically challenging many Indian women. This work makes an exploration of the writing of prominent Indian academics and activists as they debate feminism in the context of Indian culture, society and politics and search its theoretical foundations in India. The inescapable linkages with western feminism, the position of women in colonial and independent India, and the challenges to Indian feminism postured by globalization and the Hindu Right will be discussed.
 

SelectedReading List
 
Anagol, Padma. The emergence of feminism in India, 1850-1920. Hampshire: Ashgate, 2005.
 
Bhasin, K. & Nighat Said Khan. Feminism and its relevance in South Asia. Women Unlim 2004.
 
Bhasin, Kamla. Understanding gender. Women unlimited, 2003.
 
Chaudhuri, Maitrayee (ed). Feminism in India . New Delhi: Kali for Women, 2004.
 
Menon , Nivedita. Gender and politics in India. Oxford University Press, 2002.
 
Menon, Nivedita. Seeing like a feminist. Penguin UK, 2012.
 
 

Spicmacay

Friday, Apr 19, 2013 - 6:30 pm to Saturday, Apr 20, 2013 - 8:00 pm

107 Old Cabell Hall, 402 Chemistry Auditorium

Arab Women in Literature

Friday, Apr 19, 2013 - 12:00 pm to Saturday, Apr 20, 2013 - 5:15 pm

242 New Cabell Hall

Syria: Behind the Headlines

Tuesday, Apr 16, 2013 - 5:15 pm

WB104

Theory Dessert: Suzanne Stetkevych, Western Colonialism and Arabic Neo-Classical Poetry: Canonization and Repudiation

Friday, Apr 12, 2013 - 1:00 pm

211 Gibson Hall

Ask Big Questions: A Creative Contest

Tuesday, Apr 09, 2013 - 7:00 pm

The Humanities Tent
Ask Big Questions is a new organization on grounds that seeks to create change through conversation.
As part of Humanities Week, we are opening the conversation to the community as a whole.
We want to hear your thoughts on the topic: “What Does It Mean To Be Human?”
We are offering $600 in cash prizes for art pieces that are the most creative and the most moving on the theme of being human.
All submissions are welcome – anything from poetry to a short film to a painting to a song!
In addition to a people’s choice award, a panel of judges
from the Arts and Humanities Departments will select winners.
Join us on April 11 for an exhibition of the works
and an evening to celebrate the humanities!
ABQ: A Creative Contest
The Humanities Tent
Hor dourves will be served!
Interested in entering? All submissions due April 1st with the attached form.

 


Vice Versa

Friday, Apr 05, 2013 - 2:30 pm

148 Clark Library

A joint event in Arabic and English about Arab stereotypes in American film and American stereotypes in Arab film. The Arabic presentation will be at 2:30 P.M., and the English presentation will begin at 3:00 PM. 


Iran Day: A Norooz Celebration!

Saturday, Mar 30, 2013 - 6:00 pm

Newcomb Ballroom
The Persian Cultural Society invites you to join us for
IRAN DAY: A NOROOZ CELEBRATION!
 
There will be dances, skits, cooking demonstrations, poetry, and even a fashion show....not to mention FREE FOOD from Ariana's Kabob.

The Qasida: Classical Arabic Poetry

Friday, Mar 29, 2013 - 12:00 pm

O'Hill Forum

THE QASIDA - CLASSICAL ARABIC POETRY

MESALC lecturer Bilal Maanaki introduces the Qasida, the ancient poetry form used for epics in Arabic. Learn some of the most reknown figures of Arabic poetry, and how to identify a Qasida. This is part of the new Arabic Lecture Series which allows students of all levels to engage with Modern Standard


Ziojuana: Detoxing Illusions of Israel's Democracy

Wednesday, Mar 27, 2013 - 6:30 pm

125 Minor Hall

+Free Dinner! (Catered by Kabob Palace)

Max Blumenthal Ziojuana

High on Zionism: The Indoctrination of Apartheid Israel Today

Award-winning investigative journalist, blogger, and New York times best-selling author, Max Blumenthal will be talking about his recent travels and reporting from Israel and the Palestinian occupied territories. The topic of the talk will be a critical examination of the Arab-Israeli conflict and Israel's policies following the recent elections.

Blumenthal is a Puffin Writing Fellow at the New York-based Nation Institute, a research fellow for Media Matters for America and former senior writer at The Daily Beast. Blumenthal’s work has been featured on NPR, MSNBC, The Nation, Washington Monthly, The American Prospect, The Huffington Post, Salon.com, Al Jazeera English, Democracy Now!, Countdown with Keith Olbermann, Morning Joe and The Rachel Maddow Show, among many others. Max Blumenthal is the son of former top advisor to President Bill Clinton - Sidney Blumenthal.

This event is co-sponsored by Project Nur, the Global Development Organization, Middle Eastern Leadership Council, Alumni Hall, College Council, Cultural Programming Board, Persian Cultural Society, and the Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages & Cultures department.

FB event: https://www.facebook.com/events/124344924418693/


Palestine Beyond Zionism

Thursday, Mar 21, 2013 - 7:00 pm

101 Nau Hall
MIKO PELED
"Palestine Beyond Zionism - A New Paradigm for Peace"
  • Israeli Peace Activist & author of "The General's Son"
  • Co-sponosred by the Jewish Studies Program, MESALC & the Charlottesville Center for Peace & Justice
 
Inline image 1Inline image 2
 
FB event:
Please distribute widely

A Separation

Monday, Mar 18, 2013 - 7:00 pm

Random Row Books
Persian Cultural Society at UVa Presents
Oscar Winning Movie
 
"Set in contemporary Iran, A Separation is a compelling drama about the dissolution of a marriage. Simin wants to leave Iran with her husband Nader and daughter Termeh. Simin sues for divorce when Nader refuses to leave behind his Alzheimer-suffering father. Her request having failed, Simin returns to her parents' home, but Termeh decides to stay with Nader. When Nader hires a young woman to assist with his father in his wife's absence, he hopes that his life will return to a normal state. However, when he discovers that the new maid has been lying to him, he realizes that there is more on the line than just his marriage."
Please click here to watch the trailer

 


Voices from El Sayed

Monday, Mar 18, 2013 - 6:30 pm

122 Monroe Hall
The Brody Jewish Center, Jewish Education Initiative, Hoos For Israel and The Jewish Studies Department are proud to present:
the incredible documentary "Voices from El Sayed"
 
In the picturesque Israeli Negev desert lays the Bedouin Village of El-Sayed that has the largest percentage of deaf people in the world. Through generations a unique sign language has evolved making it the most popular language in this rare society that accepts deafness as natural as life itself. The village's tranquility is interrupted by Salim's decision to change his deaf son’s fate and make him a hearing person using the Cochlear Implant Operation.
Come see what happens when change comes to the world's largest deaf community....
 
Join us for a movie screening followed by a conversation with the award winning movie director, Oded Adomi Leshem
 

 


Jerusalem, Mecca, and Qom: The Politics of Identity and Religious Peacebuilding

Friday, Feb 22, 2013 - 3:30 pm

Monroe Hall 130

Roy Hange, Mennonite Pastor and Instructor


Letters from Your Muslim Aunty: Poetry and Prose Reading

Thursday, Feb 07, 2013 - 5:00 pm

Nau Hall 101

Mohja Kahf, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, University of Arkansas